Toaster Fire

June 29, 2009 · 7 comments

in 2009,WTF?

I decided to make eggs and toast for lunch today, and nearly burnt down my house… well not really, but I did end up ruining my toaster oven and made a mess in my kitchen.

Toaster Fire

Here is how to properly start and put out a toaster oven fire:

1. Put bread in toaster
2. Set it to toast
3. Go to remove finished toast from toaster
4. Knock piece of Toast through the rack on to the heating element.
5. Ignite toast on fire
6. First piece of toast should ignite second piece of toast on fire
7. Close door and hope it puts itself out
8. Realize it needs to be put out.
9. Unplug toaster from wall
10. Spray with fire extinguisher
11. Air out apartment
12. Enjoy huge mess
13. Take photos, spread story on internet
14. Put off cleaning up huge mess

I am guessing I should just throw out the toaster over, since it is now covered with fire powder.

When is the last time you lit something on fire?

Also just as a note… if you rent/own/stay at someones house with a kitchen, you should spend the 10-20$ on a fire extinguisher so you do not burn the fucking place down "When Good Bread Turns into BAD TOAST!"

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{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Mikey 06.29.09 at 6:00 pm

When I was 5, my dad got an electric charcoal lighter for his birthday. He hadn't opened it yet, and being the curious child I was, I poked a hole in the plastic wrapper and plugged it into the wall in our living room. When it didn't do anything, I left the room to watch Thundercats.

Within a few minutes, our living room was on fire. My baby sitter beat the fire out with a blanket. The worst, though, is that my little brother Timmy lay in a crib not far from the fire, but he ended up just fine.

2 nicole 06.29.09 at 6:16 pm

a few years ago i was attempting to recreate those fabulous broiled peppers that are served at tapas bars all over chicago. i checked them after a minute and all was well but since broilers tend to work their magic pretty fast, i was keeping a close eye on them. not quick enough. i turned my back for less than a minute and when i turned back i saw a bright light through the window oven. i opened the door and sure enough, fire in the hole. not having any idea what to do i quickly shut the door hoping that lack of oxygen would put it out. that suddenly seemed like a bad idea so i took the peppers out of the oven. now i had flaming peppers on top of my stove (not to mention splattering oil). with no extinguisher in the house i decided to put them out with the towel. luckily this worked. if i had set the towel on fire i probably would have lost my mind and burned the house down.

i now have an old oven that i doubt could broil anything, but i give a hearty thumbs up to the kitchen sized fire extinguishers.

3 andrea 07.02.09 at 9:38 am

one time I put a cracker with some butter on it into our toaster oven when I kid because I thought it'd be a good idea and within a couple seconds the entire cracker had gone up in flames and disintegrated. I think I was like 6 and definitely should not have been using a toaster oven unsupervised.

4 kristen 07.02.09 at 2:34 pm

was this by any chance the leftover rye bread from dad's bday festivities???

5 werty 07.02.09 at 2:35 pm

Yeah… it toasted and dried out quickly, then went up in flames when it hit the heating element.

6 httpwebwitch 07.06.09 at 8:29 am

The powder in those things is just pressurized baking soda. Wipes away easily, but yes it sticks to everything and gets into every nook and crevass imaginable

7 werty 07.06.09 at 2:48 pm

Ian, that is the type of powder in some… that is white though. This one is a slight yellow, according to wikipedia it is:

# Ammonium phosphate, also known as "tri-class", "multipurpose" or "ABC" dry chemical, used on class A, B, and C fires. It receives its class A rating from the agent's ability to melt and flow at 177 °C (350 °F) to smother the fire. More corrosive than other dry chemical agents. Pale yellow in color.

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